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June 28, 2017
Upon return from the Law and Society Review Conference in Mexico City, Mark Massoud pens this op-ed for the San Francisco Chronicle recounting the vibrant culture he observed.  
June 5, 2017
Jeannine Bell discusses hate crimes on the NPR program On Point as well as the the The Kojo Nnamdi Show


April 10, 2017
Anna-Maria Marshall offers insight into why women frequently struggle to assert their rights in cases of workplace sexual harassment in this New York Times article.  A small percentage of women who have experienced harassment in the workplace file a formal complains, and this is sometimes taken as evidence that there is not a problem.  However, women often do not report harassment for fear of retaliation or to avoid a company's grievance procedures that do more to protect the company than to protect women in the workplace. 

March 20, 2017

Police accountability for tragic shootings is hard to accomplish.  Thanks to Jeannine Bell, who argues in the March 20 USA Today that implicit bias influences jurors charged with deciding upon the guilt or innocence of police officers in the United States charged with shooting African American men.  Without considering implicit bias, jurors can ask themselves whether a police officer could have been afraid of an African American man, even when unarmed.  The answer is too often yes, and under the instructions judges use, that can be enough to acquit.  We can disrupt implicit bias: we have to remind ourselves of it, and ask different questions, in this case whether a police officer could have had a good reason to be afraid, or whether a white person would have occasioned so much fear.  She also argues that since trust in the police varies by race, juries in these cases must be racially diverse, and they often are not.  



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Workshop for Junior Scholars, University of Cape Town

Convened by Mark Fathi Massoud of the University of California, Santa Cruz (USA), and Kelley Moult and Dee Smythe of the University of Cape Town (South Africa), the first Sociolegal Studies Early Career Scholars Workshop in Africa took place at the Centre for Law and Society, University of Cape Town Faculty of Law, 17-20 August 2017.
The conveners are grateful to the University of Cape Town Faculty of Law (including Dean Penny Andrews and the team at the UCT Centre of Law & Society for hosting the workshop), to the Law and Society Association for a small grant award, to the six mentors and six participants and others who attended the sessions, to Law & Society Review for its co-sponsorship of the workshop, and to the Fulbright specialist program for its support of LSR co-editor Susan Sterett’s visit and participation in all events.
The conveners selected scholars to present their work in a competitive process. Six participants and two alternates came from a range of countries, …

LSR Writing Workshop in South Africa

Writing Workshop in Africa
Law & Society Review is co-sponsoring the inaugural Sociolegal Studies Early Career Workshop, held at the University of Cape Town (South Africa), 17-19 August 2017. Financial support is provided by the University of Cape Town and a 2017 Law and Society Association Small Grant award.
Why hold a writing workshop in sociolegal studies in Africa? Responding to a call among members of the Law and Society Association for more research in law and society by scholars living and working in the global South, this workshop is designed for advanced doctoral students and early career faculty in Africa.The workshop is purposefully small, to promote focused discussion, mentoring, and peer networking. The goal is to give a promising group of manuscripts the close attention they deserve from senior scholars and mentors, to help ready those papers for submission and publication.
Six participants and their papers have now been selected for inclusion into the inau…

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By Susan M Sterett
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However, on September 24, 2017, I watched the unfolding display by U.S. football teams concerning the U.S. national anthem, which is sung before every sports game. The quarterback Colin Kaepernick went to bended knee last year during the anthem to protest police violence against African Americans. He’s not employed as a football player this season.

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