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Media

June 28, 2017
Upon return from the Law and Society Review Conference in Mexico City, Mark Massoud pens this op-ed for the San Francisco Chronicle recounting the vibrant culture he observed.  
June 5, 2017
Jeannine Bell discusses hate crimes on the NPR program On Point as well as the the The Kojo Nnamdi Show


April 10, 2017
Anna-Maria Marshall offers insight into why women frequently struggle to assert their rights in cases of workplace sexual harassment in this New York Times article.  A small percentage of women who have experienced harassment in the workplace file a formal complains, and this is sometimes taken as evidence that there is not a problem.  However, women often do not report harassment for fear of retaliation or to avoid a company's grievance procedures that do more to protect the company than to protect women in the workplace. 

March 20, 2017

Police accountability for tragic shootings is hard to accomplish.  Thanks to Jeannine Bell, who argues in the March 20 USA Today that implicit bias influences jurors charged with deciding upon the guilt or innocence of police officers in the United States charged with shooting African American men.  Without considering implicit bias, jurors can ask themselves whether a police officer could have been afraid of an African American man, even when unarmed.  The answer is too often yes, and under the instructions judges use, that can be enough to acquit.  We can disrupt implicit bias: we have to remind ourselves of it, and ask different questions, in this case whether a police officer could have had a good reason to be afraid, or whether a white person would have occasioned so much fear.  She also argues that since trust in the police varies by race, juries in these cases must be racially diverse, and they often are not.  



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