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Postdoctoral Opportunity


The Newcomb College Institute of Tulane University seeks two postdoctoral fellows in law and society. We seek applicants whose research takes an intersectional approach to law and society, reflecting how gender, race, class, disability, sexuality, ethnic, community, immigration status, and national identities shape law and, in turn, how law shapes those identities. We will consider applicants beginning in the Spring of 2019, Summer of 2019 or Fall of 2019 for a single semester, a calendar year, or for the 2019-2020 academic year for up to two years of support per person. We prefer a two-year appointment, but are open to shorter terms.
                                                         
The fellows will receive mentoring from senior faculty, participate in our interdisciplinary community focused on intersectionality, and mentor undergraduate student research assistants. We expect fellow to participate in brown bag seminars, receptions, and other programming, mentor one or more undergraduate research assistants, and help to organize a workshop in the fall of the second year of the fellowship. We especially invite applicants whose research and teaching interests focus on and/or contribute to increased understanding of law, intersectionality, and identity in New Orleans, Louisiana, and/or the Gulf Coast South, as well as those with a demonstrated commitment to building interdisciplinary community.

Applicants should apply via Interfolio (https://apply.interfolio.com/56162) and should include:
·A cover letter explaining their research interests, length of time they would want to be in residence, when they would want to start, and identifying the Tulane faculty member or members they would work most closely with
· A C.V.
· A list of three references

Questions may be addressed to Laura Wolford, Assistant Director of the Newcomb College Institute at lwolford@tulane.edu. Screening will begin November 15, 2018 and continue until the positions are filled.

Tulane University is an equal employment opportunity/affirmative action/persons with disabilities/veterans employer committed to excellence through diversity. Tulane will not discriminate against individuals with disabilities or veterans. All eligible candidates are encouraged to apply.

Qualifications:

1. PhD in Political Science, History, American Studies, Sociology, Women and/or Gender Studies, Psychology, or other closely related fields. Ph.D must be in hand when appointment starts.

2. Demonstrated research interests which an intersectional approach to law and society, reflecting how gender, race, class, disability, sexuality, ethnic, community, immigration status, and national identities shape law and, in turn, how law shapes those identities.

3. Preference given to applicants whose research and teaching interests focus on and/or contribute to increased understanding of law, intersectionality, and identity in New Orleans, Louisiana, and/or the Gulf Coast South, as well as those with a demonstrated commitment to building interdisciplinary community.

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