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A Summer Recap of Recent Popular Articles: “See What Your Colleagues are Reading in LSR.”


For some of us, in theory anyway, the summer months bring more time for reading and reflection. So, in between summer novels, you might wish to take a look at this selection of outstanding and recent articles published in the Law and Society Review.


The special issue is posted on the journal’s home page: “See What Your Colleagues are Reading in LSR.” We encourage you to take a look at this diverse and engaging collection of law and society scholarship. 

The range of issues covered is wonderful and collected from across our issues—migrant workers’ right, immigration processes and sanctions, rights coalition building, reexaminations of procedural justice claims, counter-terrorism work, and legal cynicism and situational trust. 
 
Remember, if you see something you wish to comment on or engage with, the Law and Society Review Blog is just the place to do that.

Best,

Margot Young
Co-Editor
UBC Law

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