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LSR in Mexico City


The recent LSA meetings in Mexico City allowed the three co-editors and the book review editor, as well as the representative from the publisher, Wiley, to talk about the Law and Society Review (LSR). We covered journal business with Mexican spicy hot chocolate in hand.  Look for more posts on this Blog summarizing recent articles, on writing manuscripts, and on opportunities to write book reviews.  

 Jeannine and Margot also met with a group of LSR Board Members over breakfast.  We are grateful for the energy, expertise, and enthusiasm these scholars bring to our journal team.  We invited posts to the blog from board members.  (We invite them from everyone in the law and society community.)  Board members suggested ideas for some virtual special issues.  These issues allow us to gather already published articles.  When we put those together, Wiley makes the articles freely available for a time.  Susan represented the Co-editors on both the LSA Board of Trustees and the Publication Committee, where they discussed trends in publishing, including the press for open access, questions of data transparency, and the coming search for a new editorial team.  

All three Co-editors and the Book Review Editor participated in a panel session on publishing in the Law and Society Review with about 30 scholars in attendance  . Each of the Co-editors also did a panel at the graduate student session on journal publishing - covering law reviews in and out of the US, and socio-legal journals like Law and Society Review. 

It was a busy set of meetings for the editors but it was a pleasure to see each other in person and to chat with so many of our current, and future, authors and reviewers.   

Susan Sterett, Jeannine Bell, and Margot Young-Coeditors LSR
Jennifer Balint LSR Book Review Editor

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