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Showing posts from July, 2017

LSR in Mexico City

The recent LSA meetings in Mexico City allowed the three co-editors and the book review editor, as well as the representative from the publisher, Wiley, to talk about the Law and Society Review (LSR). We covered journal business with Mexican spicy hot chocolate in hand.  Look for more posts on this Blog summarizing recent articles, on writing manuscripts, and on opportunities to write book reviews.  
 Jeannine and Margot also met with a group of LSR Board Members over breakfast.  We are grateful for the energy, expertise, and enthusiasm these scholars bring to our journal team.  We invited posts to the blog from board members.  (We invite them from everyone in the law and society community.)  Board members suggested ideas for some virtual special issues.  These issues allow us to gather already published articles.  When we put those together, Wiley makes the articles freely available for a time.  Susan represented the Co-editors on both the LSA Board of Trustees and the Publication Com…

Asking Who in Gang Violence Prevention

Tony Cheng
JD Candidate at New York University, School of Law
PhD Candidate at Yale University, Sociology Department


Who do violence preventers target to achieve violence prevention?  Targeting is a process of defining what qualifies as relevant violence and selecting concretely on whom to focus efforts.  Law enforcement are not the only ones making targeting decisions—non-profits are increasingly deploying credible street outreach workers (SOWs) who can build relationships with targeted gang members and channel prosocial influences.  SOW-oriented programs have existed since the 1930s, but have gained new life with Cure Violence’s public health approach, which conceptualizes SOWs as interveners positioned to block the transmission of violence among the highest risk targets.  Yet we know remarkably little about how SOWs build relationships and which strategies actually work.  Program evaluations of Cure Violence replications have yielded mixed results, sometimes even revealing increased v…

Sanctuary

By Susan Bibler Coutin University of California, Irvine  As campuses, restaurants, churches, and cities nationwide have adopted sanctuary policies to protect students, employees, customers, and residents from President Trump’s ramped up efforts to deport members of immigrant communities, it is worthwhile to consider how the lessons of the 1980s sanctuary movement might apply to today’s advocacy work.Between 1986 and 1988, I conducted participant observation within sanctuary communities in Tucson, Arizona and the San Francisco East Bay in California. At that time, sanctuary focused on obtaining refuge for asylum seekers who were fleeing U.S-funded wars in Central America.I attended sanctuary events, volunteered with the movement, and interviewed over 100 participants, leading to publication of my 1993 book, The Culture of Protest:Religious Activism and the U.S. Sanctuary Movement. Congregations that declared themselves sanctuaries during the 1980s were motivated by a sense of emergency. …