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Showing posts from June, 2017

Questioning Disruption in the Counter-Terrorism Fight

By Martin Innes et al
In a brief article written for The Times Newspaper following the recent marauding terrorist attack near London Bridge, Assistant Commissioner Mark Rowley who is the UK police service national lead for counter-terrorism, revealed that Khuram Butt, the alleged ring-leader of the attackers, had previously been targeted by several disruptions. In so doing, Rowley validated one of the central claims of our article published in the June edition of Law and Society Review, where we highlighted the danger of police and intelligence services becoming overly-reliant upon disrupting violent extremists. 

Of course, our analysis had not predicted the specific details of the incident. But one of its central claims was that delivery of the Prevent strategy, part of the UK government’s wider counter-terrorism policy, was becoming heavily dependent upon a logic of disruption. Disruption is a form of prevention whereby interventions are designed to inhibit the possibilities of actio…

On Communicating Scholarship

By Susan M. Sterett


Authors want guides when revising.  Jeannine, Margot and I almost always recommend that authors think again about how they make readers care.  What does your work tell us about sociolegal processes? If readers are not interested in your particular topic or research site, why would they care about what you’ve written? Authors can always answer that, but they need to.  Your data, for whatever kind of data you use, need a story. 
You can tell that story in a different fashion  in a blog post, which might reach students and draw a wider audience for your work.  Everyone I’ve heard in the two meetings I went to over the last couple of days (discussed  below) has urged that communicating research to a broader audience is crucial today.  
At least within the United States, the question of how to make your work mean something to others has taken on greater bite.  Funding cuts to agencies such as the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundat…